Christmas Decorations for Cleveleys

Christmas Decorations for Cleveleys

Get out your scissors and empty bottles, and have fun making Christmas Decorations for Cleveleys!

This year is the year Cleveleys Community Reclaims Christmas! Different groups are doing their best to organise a much better festive display this year and need YOU to help to make it look smashing!

Make Christmas Decorations for Cleveleys

At home, at work, at school, in your groups and at the community make event, we want you to make your own decorations. Then bring them along to trim up the town.

  • Half the fun is in making them – getting crafty, making friends and having a good old fashioned community time.
  • The other half of the fun is in seeing the results and how lovely the town will look because WE’VE made it!

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You’re all invited to join in the fun. Make decorations at home or with your own community group. Come along to the community making morning to help and then come along to the trimming up morning to see the town twinkle.

  1. Make at Home – all of the instructions are below, including snowflake templates to print out and trace.
  2. Community Making morning – Monday 25 November from 10-12am at the Community Centre on Beach Road
    Bring bottles you’ve collected and anything that you’ve made at home.
  3. Town Centre Trimming up Morning – Monday 2 December 10-12 meet at the clock bed near Wilkinsons.
    Bring your decorations along to put into place.

What Can you Make?

The plan is to trim up the clock planter and the bollards with decorations made out of empty bottles. We’re garlanding the clock with snowflakes on cord threads and topping the bollards with twizzly things!

We’d like you to pre-make your decorations and drop them off at Cleveleys Community Centre in time for the Community Making Event. At the event we’ll be assembling all the parts, ready to put them up at the Community Decorating Day. Please join in and come along – it will be good fun!

Snowflakes

The easiest and quickest decorations for this year are milk bottle and bottom bottle snowflakes. Please make as many as you can for the best effect in the display.

We’ve tried to keep them easy to make, requiring the minimum amount of materials and equipment, and durable enough to last the season. Here are some things that you’ll need:

Materials to make snowflakes

It’s easier to take bottles to bits with a stanley knife. Please be careful and don’t let children use sharp knives. Scissors are fine for trimming shapes out once you’ve taken the bottom off the bottle.

Pens: Something to trace out milk bottle snowflakes. If you’ve got one, a permanent pen is easiest and won’t come off all over your fingers. A biro might work too. For drawing the snowflake pattern itself you need a PERMANENT paint pen. They’re usually the ones that have a ball bearing inside and rattle when you shake them. Posca, UniBall and Pentel are some of the brands you’re looking for.

It must be permanent then it won’t wash off in the rain. The same goes for glitter – glitter glue goes back sticky when it gets wet and also washes off.

Milk Bottle Snowflakes

Milk bottle snowflakes

Here’s what to do –

Wash out and dry your plastic milk bottle. Any size will do, the bigger the bottle the more you’ll get from each one.

Print out this template on a sheet of A4 paper. It’s the shape for cutting out the piece of plastic and the pattern for tracing out the snowflake. There are two identical ones on a sheet – perhaps someone could cut while you paint snowflakes?

If you haven’t got a printer, you could copy the template onto a piece of paper, or even try and trace it from your phone. If you can print it out it will make sizing it much easier for you as it doesn’t need adjusting.

Cut the bottom off the bottle and cut around the handle shape. This bit is easier with a stanley knife. Then cut through the narrow bit to open your bottle out flat.

Cut open your milk bottle to make snowflakes

Place the flat plastic over the top of the starfish (ish) shape and trace around it in pen. Cut your shape out with scissors.

Then put your plastic shape back over the template and trace the pattern of the snowflake in your silver or gold paint pen. (Silver is pretty but gold does show up more). Let the paint dry before handling it.

Trace the snowflake pattern

Then broddle a small hole about 1cm away from the end of a point. Cut a piece of Christmas ribbon about 60cm long (2′) and thread it through the hole. Knot it close to the plastic, without pulling it tight or putting it under tension. That way the ribbon won’t pull on the plastic and rip it.

Repeat!

Bottle Bottom Snowflakes

There are two versions of these, depending on what type of bottle you’ve got! Thicker plastic, like cordial bottles, conveniently come with a pretty, snowflake-esque pattern imprinted in them! Pop bottle bottoms can be made into snowflakes with a bit of persuasion…

Bottle bottom snowflakes

Cordial Bottle Snowflakes

Roughly cut the bottom off the bottle. Again, it’s easier to cut them off with a stanley knife. Put the bottle on one side – we’ll use it to make a bollard topper. Then trim the waste off with scissors to make a neat, flat circle. Copy the snowflake shape with your paint pen. You can get all sorts of patterns from Google images.

How to make cordial bottle bottom snowflakes

Then broddle a small hole in the disc. Cut a piece of Christmas ribbon about 60cm long (2′) and thread it through the hole. Knot it close to the plastic, without pulling it tight or putting it under tension. That way the ribbon won’t pull on the plastic and rip it.

Pop Bottle Snowflakes

Do the same thing to roughly take the bottom off your bottle with a stanley knife. Save the bottle for a bollard topper. Use a pair of scissors to trim the waste around the bumps in the bottle to make a flower shape.

Pop bottle snowflakes

Depending on what colour your bottle is you might want to spray it at this point. Clear, blue or green plastic would look pretty left au naturelle. Grey or sludgy coloured plastic would be better sprayed in white, silver or gold. Let the paint dry thoroughly if you do spray.

Then draw a snowflake pattern on the outside. Broddle a small hole about 1cm away from the end of a point. Cut a piece of Christmas ribbon about 60cm long (2′) and thread it through the hole. Knot it close to the plastic, without pulling it tight or putting it under tension. That way the ribbon won’t pull on the plastic and rip it.

Bollard Toppers

There’s something like 300 bollards along the high street in Cleveleys! So there are plenty to go at, if we manage to decorate 30 we’ll do well!

Bollard toppers made from empty pop bottles

These decorations are similar in principle to the type of thing you’d see at the end of a church pew at a wedding. A pair of matching twizzles and a piece of ‘ribbon’. Here’s how to make them –

You will need:

  • two smaller bottles and two larger bottles for each decoration.
  • metallic spray paint
  • thin garden wire to fasten the bottles together

You’ve already cut the bottoms off the bottles to make snowflakes. Spray the outside of the bottles with metallic or white paint and leave to dry properly.

With your scissors at about 45 degrees, start at the bottom of the bottle and cut diagonally through it, circling around the bottle to about 2.5cm (1″) away from the top. Cut more strips, parallel to the one you’ve already cut, about 3 or 4cm in width. Try to make them about the same width. Cut all four bottles in the same way. Punch one hole in each of the lids of the larger bottles.

  • Wider strips (and less of them) will make it a tighter corkscrew. Narrow strips (and more of them) will make them dangle longer and straighter and be less curly. It doesn’t matter what width you prefer, just try to make your bottles match each other so your decoration isn’t lopsided!

Cut a piece of garden wire about 30cm long. Fasten it around the rim of the smaller bottle and thread it through the small hole in the top of the bigger bottle. Pull the smaller bottle up as far as it will go and splay the wires so that they stay fastened together.

The phone shop at Rossall Road has donated soft polystyrene wrapping to use for bows. We’ll strap them onto bollards with cable ties on the trimming up day and dress with the ribbon and bow.

Points to Note

  1. It’s the first year we’re going reclaimed, recycled and reused. It won’t be a 100% green display but it will be 100% better than the alternative.
  2. We’re trying to be a bit co-ordinated about it so please try to stick to the colour scheme of silver/gold/white/pastel colours.
  3. Please make as many decorations as you can and bring them along ready to assemble/install. The more that people make the better the display will look.

This is one of several things being done by the community for the community this year. Find out about Christmas in Cleveleys here.

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