See the Isle of Man from Cleveleys

See the Isle of Man from Cleveleys

Did you know that you can see the Isle of Man from Cleveleys? It’s 100km from land at the Fylde Coast – but it can still sometimes be seen from Cleveleys. So how’s that?

Can you See the Isle of Man from Cleveleys?

The tallest hill on the Isle of Man is Snaefell. At the very top it’s 621 metres above sea level. At that distance away, you should only be able to see the top of Snaefell from here on the Fylde Coast.

Yet sometimes at sunset on a clear night, and more rarely during the day, you can see much more of it than you should be able to. And that’s also taking into account the curve of the earth, as the view disappears over the horizon.

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When it’s visible it appears as bumps along the horizon, seen through the turbines of the wind farms.

See the Isle of Man in Photos taken from Cleveleys

Have a look at this timeline of photos taken of the view out over the Irish Sea. Not only can you see the Isle of Man, but the timeline also documents the growth of the offshore wind farms. Interestingly, there’s a marked improvement in the quality of the photos too, as camera technology gets better.

These photos are all taken by Visit Cleveleys – except where credited to another photographer.

View of the windfarm and Isle of Man, May 2017
View of the windfarm and Isle of Man, May 2017
View of the windfarm July 2017. See the feint outline of the Isle of Man at the left of shot
View of the windfarm July 2017. See the faint outline of the Isle of Man at the left of shot
View of the Isle of Man in 2016, taken by David Pennington
View of the Isle of Man in 2016, taken by David Pennington
Taken in 2015
Taken in 2015
March 2013
March 2013
View of the Isle of Man August 2012
View of the Isle of Man August 2012
View of the Isle of Man August 2012
Also taken in August 2012
Taken April 2012
Taken April 2012
A rare daylight view of the Isle of Man, August 2011
A rare daylight view of the Isle of Man, August 2011
View of the Isle of Man, July 2011
View of the Isle of Man, July 2011

The Isle of Man Mirage

If you are lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time, you are seeing the Isle of Man with the help of an atmospheric phenomenon.

Tony Heyes is a scientist who we’ve made acquaintance with and he publishes a website at www.overwyre.info
Click through to the link for the full scientific and mathematical explanation of why this mirage occurs!

In short, it happens because the light rays from the Isle of Man are bent by the atmosphere, before reaching our eyes here on the Fylde Coast.

More about the Isle of Man Mirage

Refractive looming, refractive towering and maybe a Superior Mirage, helps you to get a clear view of the hills and valleys of the Isle of Man. The light is affected by the atmospheric conditions.

A superior mirage is a reasonably rare event, seen when the air near to the ground is colder than the air above it. Or in this case, the sea and the air just above it maintains a cold temperature as the less dense air above it can warm up more quickly.

In this instance, the layers of differing refractive index cause the rays of light to be bent. Sometimes they’re reflected downwards.

Under these conditions you can actually see over the horizon. That’s why you can see more of the Isle of Man than you strictly should be able to from Cleveleys.

Refractive Towering
Refractive Towering

Refractive Looming
Refractive Looming

While you’re here…

Have a look at the Visit Cleveleys website homepage for more of the latest updates.

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